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THE BUSINESS RESEARCHER NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES

Feb 20, 2002 Volume 5, Number 2

 CONTENTS

* Introduction - Editor's Comments

* What's New at www.gdsourcing.ca

* Statistics Canada releases

* Researching the Private Education & Training Sector

* They're coming! Census 2001 Results!

* Small Business Stats Facts

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INTRODUCTION - EDITOR'S COMMENTS

 

Hello,

Thank you for your subscription.

For some reason I am speechless this month, so I have nothing to say!

I hope you find this issue helpful.

Sincerely,

John White
Editor

 

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WHAT'S NEW AT www.gdsourcing.ca - OUTLOOK, CITIES & SALARIES

 

The following web sites were added to the GDSourcing index over the last four weeks. GDSourcing is a reference point for free Canadian statistics on-line.

 

DRI-WEFA
Site: http://www.dri-wefa.com/

GDSourcing Site Summary: http://www.gdsourcing.ca/works/DRIWEFA.htm

Summary forecast of Canadian economy 2000, 2001, 2002-2006.


COMPETITIVE ALTERNATIVES
Site: http://www.competitivealternatives.com/

GDSourcing Site Summary: http://www.gdsourcing.ca/works/KPMGCost.htm


Cost of doing business by industry sector, international city comparisons


OFFICE TEAM
Site: http://www.officeteam.com/

GDSourcing Site Summary: http://www.gdsourcing.ca/works/OfficeTeam.htm

Compensation (salary) trends for administrative positions in Canada. Also includes cost of living index for Canadian cities.

 

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STATISTICS CANADA RELEASES

 

The following statistics were release by Statistics Canada over the last three weeks. We have listed those releases we feel are of the most interest to Canadian entrepreneurs.

Very few of these statistics are available on-line. The URL listed is a direct link to the press release associated with the data. It provides contact and ordering information.

If you want to purchase any publication related to these releases please see our web site: http://www.gdsourcing.ca/works/StatCan.htm

We offer a 20% discount on most Stats Can publications and a 10% discount on Stats Can electronic products. For more information you can reach us at contact@gdsourcing.com. Put "StatsCan" in the subject line of your e-mail.

We have identified below which releases have a FREE publication associated with them.

 

AGRICULTURE

Chicken production 2001 (preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020207/d020207e.htm


Growers of genetically modified grain corn and soybeans: A profile 2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020213/d020213c.htm


Fruit and vegetable production 2001 (preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020215/d020215a.htm

 


ARTS, CULTURE, ENTERTAINMENT & RECREATION

Sound Recording Survey 1998
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020130/d020130g.htm


Movie theatres and drive-ins 1999/2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020207/d020207a.htm



BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES

Deposit-accepting intermediaries: Activities and economic performance, 2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020125/td020125.htm


Survey of Suppliers of Business Financing 2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020129/d020129b.htm


Financial and taxation statistics for enterprises 1999
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020130/d020130f.htm



CONSTRUCTION

Building permits Annual 2001 (preliminary) and December 2001
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020206/d020206a.htm

 


EDUCATION

Literacy skills, occupational assignment and the returns to over- and
under-education 1994 to 1998
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020125/d020125e.htm



HEALTH

Unmet health care needs 1998/99
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020124/d020124b.htm



JUSTICE

Case processing in criminal courts 1999/2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020207/d020207f.htm


Police personnel and expenditures in Canada 2001
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020212/d020212d.htm



MANUFACTURING

Changes in the diversification of Canadian manufacturing firms and plants 1973 to 1997
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020205/d020205d.htm



PRIMARY

Coal production 2001 (preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020201/d020201c.htm


Oil and gas extraction 2001 (preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020204/d020204a.htm


Domestic sales of refined petroleum products December 2001 and annual 2001(preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020212/d020212b.htm



SMALL BUSINESS

Survey of Self-employment 2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020129/d020129d.htm



TRADE

Department store sales and stocks December 2001 and annual 2001 (preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020131/d020131c.htm

 

New motor vehicle sales December 2001 and annual 2001
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020214/d020214b.htm



TRANSPORTATION

Aircraft movement statistics December 2001 and 2001 annual (preliminary)
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020208/d020208b.htm


Dangerous goods accident information system 2000
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020129/b020129a.htm

 

 

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RESEARCHING THE PRIVATE EDUCATION & TRAINING SECTOR IN CANADA

The demand for private education and training has never been higher. In
the workplace, the impact of technology has dramatically changed the skills
required by employees. The constant need for employee training and skills
upgrading has gone beyond the capabilities of many HR departments.

Outside the workplace, the advent of a highly educated population together
with dual income families has also influenced private training demands.
There is a clear desire to learn: from the need to upgrade skills for a
career change to the desire for personal interest information in
do-it-yourself activities, health concerns and entrepreneurship.

Private training/education is a very broad sector but it can be divided
into two principle markets: Personal and Business.

One of the primary sources for both markets is the Adult Education &
Training Survey. It is available on-line at the Statistics Canada web
site: http://www.statcan.ca:80/Daily/English/010510/d010510a.htm

(see link at the bottom of the news release).

This is a comprehensive survey on the trends and factors affecting adult
education in Canada. It provides details related to courses taken,
demographic factors and employer and non-employer sponsored training
activities etc.

Statistics Canada conducted the survey but it was sponsored by HRDC. It is
part of a regular data series that has been compiled in 1984, 1985, 1986,
1990, 1992 and 1994. Prior to the 1998 issue (released in 2001) the most
current information was 1994. We recommend that you look at this issue
together with the most current data in order to observe adult education
trends over the 1990s Please see
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/books/class90/aete.shtml



While the Adult Education & Training survey provides detailed information
and insights it is a bit dated. Private education and training is a
dynamic sector that recognizes the global opportunities the Internet
provides. A good overview of current trends is the Industry Canada report:
"The Canadian Education & Training Industry"
(http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/pics/bp/ets-eng.pdf).

Also look at their Sector Competitiveness reports on the Education &
Training in Canada:

Overview and Prospects
http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/bp01514e.html


Framework for Action
http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/bp01565e.html


For other reports and references see the Industry Canada commercial
education and training website: http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/bp00416e.html

It includes sections such as Sector Studies/Reports/Information Resources,
Who's Who, Newsletters etc.

While many of the studies and reports posted here are from the early
nineties, they are still well worth consulting. Studies include "Profile
of the Canadian Commercial Education and Training Suppliers", "Suppliers of
Technology-Based Workplace Training", "Market Assessment Study of New Media Learning Materials", "Getting the Most From Your Training Dollar", etc.

Strategis is a very active web resource. When new reports are available
they generally post them quickly. We recommend that researchers check this
resource regularly. There are also Industry Canada information officers
listed whom you can contact directly.

Beyond government reports, training activities are a popular area of study
for many Canadian think tanks. For example the Canadian Policy Research
Network has a report Training for the New Economy (CPRN)
http://www.cprn.com/docs/work/tne_e.pdf


Also see the New Approaches to Lifelong Learning report:
Basic Patterns of Work & Learning in Canada (NALL)
http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/sese/csew/nall/res/33working&learning.htm


The Conference Board of Canada also has conducted research in the field of
workplace training. Some reports they have produced include: Focus on
Competencies: Training & Development Practices and Trends, and Getting the
Most for Your Training Dollar: Outsourcing Trends in Corporate Training.
These are available in most reference libraries.

For more standard educational statistics such an enrollment, expenditures,
number of schools and teachers, you are best to consult the resources
available from Statistics Canada. Their web site has some highlight
information: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Pgdb/People/educat.htm


You should also consult their annual education compendium Education in
Canada (cat#81-229) and their quarterly periodical Education Quarterly
Review (cat#81-003) EQR provides statistics and analysis on recent
educational data releases. An example of one article is "Job-related
education and training - who has access?" Some training information
specific to the workplace can also be found in the Statistics Canada
periodical Perspectives on Labour and Income (cat#75-001)

Finally in the way of general education statistics, donít forget the
Council of Ministers of Education, Canada web site
http://www.cmec.ca/


HRDC produces a number of reports on training in Canada:

Employer & Employee Perspectives on Human Resource Practices: (Training
Practices)
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/books/evolving_workplace.shtml,


Results from the Survey of Self-Employment in Canada includes a section:
Training Behaviour of the Self-Employed
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/SSE_report.html


Literacy Skills, Occupational Assignment and the Returns to Over- and
Under-Education
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/books/ials/ials_en.shtml


Adult Education Participation in North America: International Perspectives
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/books/adult_lit.shtml


A Report on Adult Education and Training - Learning a Living
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/arb/publications/books/education/adults.shtml


Keep in mind that training, especially in the workplace often falls under
the heading of Human Resources. There are a number of trade publications
and sources written specifically for HR professionals. For example HR
On-line: http://www.hronline.com/, HR Professional, etc. They will provide
you with insight into trends and issues facing workplace training.


You should also contact your provincial Ministry of Education. Most
produce reports on educational performance and requirements. These reports
are important if you are planning on offering tutoring services. You must
be aware of curriculum requirements.

If you plan to offer educational services geared towards personal interest
such as dancing, spiritual needs, health concerns, crafts and hobbies, you
need to determine the demographics of the type of people interested in the
subject you plan to teach.

This can be done by consulting consumer publications that are specific to
your subject. If you contact these periodicals directly and express an
interest in advertising in them, many will provide you with a one page
demographic profile of their readership for free. You can use this profile
as an initial profile of your customers. You can then compare this
information with the 1996 Census demographic profile of your market or
better yet the more current Financial Post "Canadian Markets" profile.
Both of these resources are available in major libraries.

You can also profile the private education and training market in your
local area by using the Household Spending database. For more information
see: http://www.gdsourcing.ca/CMEinfo.htm


Again, a general periodical search can be used to gain further insights
into the popularity of various subject areas.

Do not forget to examine the marketing strategies of your competitors.
Where are they advertising? What aspect of the market are they targeting?
Young women? Seniors? A particular ethnic group? Are they advertising in
the Yellow Pages? All this information can help you to assess market
potential and penetration.

For a small business to be successful in the education and training field,
they must specialize either in the subject they teach or in the market they
target (specific demographic group or industry sector). While the above
sources are helpful, you will also need to gather information on your
specific specialty. The key here is determining who might collect
information on your market.

For larger markets such as language training, technology training or
foreign exports government sources are available:

e.g.
Providers of Language Training
http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/bp00416e.html


Summary of Matrices for Services Export Opportunities
http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/sc01185e.html


Training as a human resource strategy: The response to staff shortages and
technological change,
http://www.statcan.ca/english/IPS/Data/11F0019MIE2001154.htm


Working with computers
http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/010523/d010523b.htm


For emerging markets such as e-learning/ tele-learning both government and
private sector sources are available:


Tele-Learning in Canada
http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/sector/english/industryprofiles/learntel/overview.shtml


Straight 'A's: Virtual classrooms represent the core of new courseware for
resellers waiting to get good grades, Channel Business April 23, 2001
http://www.cbizmag.com/


The above references were found using periodical databases and Internet
search engines as well as the GDSourcing web site.

If you are focusing on provide training activities to a specific industry
we recommend you consult the trade periodical most closely related to your
market. For example Plastics Magazine conducts an annual survey of the
Canadian plastics sector. Included in the survey is data on training
budget sizes within this sector with provincial detail. The article is
Annual Survey of Buying Intentions, Plastics in Canada, Oct 1, 2001
http://www.plasticsincanada.com/


Private education and training is a growing sector in Canada and provides
many opportunities for small businesses. Opportunity however does not
automatically mean success. Make sure you take advantage of all sources
available both general and specific in nature. The insights they will
provide to you will ensure your company is properly positioned to succeed.
 

 

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THEY'RE COMING! CENSUS 2001 RESULTS!


The results of the 2001 Census will begin being released next month and
will continue being released by subject area for the next 14 months.

Statistics Canada plans to use the Internet as the preferred medium for
disseminating standard and reference products. They also promise to make
more Census data available to the public free of charge via the Internet.
(Hurrah!)

In addition to the usual information collected the 2001 Census includes
data on birthplace of parents, other languages spoken at home, and language
of work. Data was also collected on religion (a variable covered every ten
years) and on same-sex couples.

You will be hearing a lot about the Census over the next year. For
businesses selling to consumers, it is the cornerstone of your local market
research. The following table is the official schedule of release.

 

MARCH 12, 2002
Population & dwelling counts


JULY 16, 2002
Age & Sex


OCTOBER 22, 2002
Marital Status,
Common-law,
Families, Dwellings, households and collectives


DECEMBER 10, 2002
Language,
Mobility & migration


JANUARY 21, 2002
Citizenship,
Immigration,
Birthplace & birthplace of parents,
Ethnic origin,
Visible minorities,
Aboriginal peoples


FEBRUARY 11, 2003
Labour force activity,
Class of worker,
Occupation,
Industry,
Unpaid work,
Place of work,
Mode of transportation,
Language of work


MARCH 11, 2003
School attendance,
Education,
Field of study,
Highest level of schooling,
Earnings


MAY 13, 2003
Religion
Income of individuals, families and households,
Social & economic characteristics of individuals, families & households
Shelter costs

 


For more information on the upcoming Census release see the Statistics
Canada publication 2001 Census Preview of Products & Services
(http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/92-376-XIE/92-376-XIE01000.pdf)


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SMALL BUSINESS STATS FACTS

1. What percentage of self-employed Canadians are women?

Women: 32.1
Men: 67.9

Source: Statistics Canada (Jan 2001)
 

2. At what age did those who are currently self-employed begin their latest
venture?


UNDER 17..1.6%
17-19.....2.9%
20-21.....3.6%
22-24.....8.1%
25-26.....6.8%
27-29....11.4%
30-34....19.2%
35-39....15.7%
40-44....11.7%
45-49.....8.9%
50-54.....6.8%
55-59.....2.4%
60-69.....0.9%

Source: Statistics Canada (Jan 2001)


3. What percentage of self-employed in Canada have their spouse as a
business partner?

Yes: 30.7%
No: 69.3%

Source: Statistics Canada (Jan 2001)


4. What are the top three industry sectors for self-employment in Canada

Professional, scientific, technical services: 15.1%
Construction: 12.6%
Retail Trade 9.7%

Source: Statistics Canada (Jan 2001)


5. What percentage of self-employed Canadians were born in Canada?

82.3%

Source: Statistics Canada (Jan 2001)


All of the above results were selected from the Survey of Self-employment
in Canada:
http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/92-376-XIE/92-376-XIE01000.pdf


 

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URL: http://www.gdsourcing.ca/newsletter/newsletter5-2.htm
UPDATED: 07/31/03
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