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ID #:   39269673
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of young Canadian couples between the ages of 18 to 35 keep completely separate bank accounts and financial products, % hold all of their accounts and products jointly

Top reasons for having separate accounts: % reported: feeling a sense of financial independence, having different financial needs

% of young couples say that planning for a financially stable future is top of mind, % of young Canadian couples say that preparing to have a child in the next five years is really important to them, % hope to buy a home in the next five years

% try to live within a set budget [budgeting] but don't always succeed, % want to be more financially independent.

 
Publication Date:   3/18/2010
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   3/18/2010
 
 
 
ID #:   39269435
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadian parents believe it will cost more than $200,000 to raise a child to the age of 18, % believe that cost is between $100,000 and $200,000, % % say it is less than $100,000

% of Canadian parents do not have life insurance, % say they are not saving enough for their child's future, % say they spend more money each month than they earn, % are living paycheque to paycheque with nothing left to save, % say they are saving a little, but not enough, % are saving about 10% of their earnings each month, % more than 10% [budgeting]

% of parents surveyed say they have life insurance, either through their workplace benefits program or through purchasing a life insurance policy, % of those with life insurance do not believe the policy will leave enough money to support their children to the age of 18.

% of parents who do not have any life insurance, % say they feel like they probably should have it, % say they cannot afford it, % say they do not believe it is necessary.

 
Publication Date:   1/25/2010
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   1/25/2010
 
 
 
ID #:   39269119
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Financial priorities of Canadians - % report: Retirement savings [RRSP], Home ownership, Regular payments to reduce or eliminate debt, General savings for a rainy day, Just trying to keep your head above water, Savings for a large self rewarding purchase e.g., vacation, etc., Saving for children or grandchildren's education, Building an investment portfolio, Home renovation, Supporting aging parents, Purchasing a recreational/investment property [cottage]

Results by age group (2008 vs. 2009)

% agree: The financial challenges of the life events that I have experienced over the past 12 months have been a big burden [Financial Crisis 2008], The emotional challenges of the life events that I have experienced over the past 12 months are a bigger burden than the financial challenges

% need help in developing a financial plan to achieve their financial goals, need help with budgeting their day-to-day expenses. [financial advisor]

 
Publication Date:   11/17/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:   Hyperlink 1 to highlights. Hyperlink 2 to data tables.
Posted/Updated:   11/17/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39269112
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   International survey on how prepared households are for financial emergencies. Includes: How confident are you that you could come up with $2000 if an unexpected need arose within the next month?

Where will funds for unexpected expense come from? (% report Draw from savings, Use credit cards, Borrow or ask for help from my family, Open or use a home equity line of credit or take out a second mortgage, Work overtime, get a second job, or another member of my household would work longer or go to work)

Results by gender, age group, Canada, provinces and selected countries [budgeting]

 
Publication Date:   11/12/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada, provinces and selected countries
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/15/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39269110
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadian women define themselves as financially successful (2009 vs 2008), Average value in household investible assets women think are required to be considered "wealthy".

Steps taken by Canadian owmen to achieve financial success - % report: follow a budget to manage spending [budgeting], pay off credit cards in full to avoid interest charges, participate in an employer-sponsored group pension plan, contribute regularly to an RRSP, save through an automatic saving or investing plan, contribute to a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)

The top three recommendations from women who consider themselves to be financially successful.

% agree that women should be completely financially independent from their spouse, % share financial planning and investment decisions, % of married women have some savings or investments in their own name, % married women who have their own personal investment portfolio are fully responsible for making decisions about their investments, make decisions jointly with their spouse or partner, defer to their spouse

How women define "financial success".

 
Publication Date:   11/12/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/15/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39269038
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadian workers report they feel they live paycheque to paycheque just to make ends meet, % who feel they live paycheque to paycheque said they have started feeling this way in 2009.

% have reduced their 401(k) contributions or personal savings in the last six months to get by. % say they do not participate in any programs such as 401(k), IRAs or retirement plans. % report that they don't put any money aside into their savings each month, % set aside $100 or less per month for savings, % less than $50. [budgeting]

 
Publication Date:   10/29/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/1/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39268992
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   To what extent is the current economic environment [Financial Crisis 2008] impacting your savings habits? (Saving more than before, Saving about the same, Saving less than before)

How easy or challenging do you personally find each of the following aspects of saving money? (Achieving a savings goal, Paying yourself 1st/Set up program, Being a disciplined saver, Setting a savings goal, Figuring out how much you can afford to save each month, Setting up a budget (budgeting), Keeping tack of your monthly expenditures. [savings account]

 
Publication Date:   10/22/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:   Hyperlink 1 to release highlights. Hyperlink 2 to graphs.
Posted/Updated:   10/22/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39268535
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadians need immediate help with their day-to-day money management [budgeting, household budget], % believe their bank has been effective in helping them manage their day-to-day money, % have learned the most about managing their daily finances from their bank.

In light of the economic downturn [Financial Crisis 2008], % say they would have done something differently six months ago, % would have spent less money or actively saved more.

 
Publication Date:   6/23/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
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Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   6/25/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39268411
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Detailed report on Canadian household debt [debt (consumer)]. Includes: Household Debt-Service Ratio - Mortgage credit, Consumer credit, Changes in household debt over the past 3 years, Changes in household debt by income group, region, Changes in debt relative to changes in income and wealth.

Reasons for increasing debt (Day-to-day living expenses, Enrolling in an educational program, Health related expenses, Expenses for leisure and entertainment, Purchase of a new residence, Purchase of consumer durables, Purchase of a new car, Interest charges)

Type of debt held by households (Bank loan other than car and student loan, Home equity line of credit, Line of credit other than home equity, Car loan, Mortgage, Credit card, Student loan)

Changes in selected types of debt, Reason for having troubles managing debt (Lower than expected income, Large unexpected expenses, Difficulties in keeping spending within planned limits [budgeting], Inadequate financial planning)

Attitude towards debt (e.g. % can manage my debt well), Does your household debt negatively affect you’re ability to reach your financial goals?

Changes in household income by respondent’s income group, Assets held by households, Change in expenditures relative to changes in income, Reasons for increased household spending, Ways of handling unforeseen expenditures of $500 and $5,000

Primary source of pension income [RRSP], Level of confidence regarding the adequacy of financial situation at retirement, % have a clear idea of the amount of retirement savings needed to accumulate, Purpose of regular saving, Use of different financial instruments in respondents’ savings portfolios [savings account], Participation in tax-preferred savings plans (RRSP, RESP, Defined benefit pension plans, Defined contribution pension plans), Awareness regarding TFSAs [Financial Advisor] [Financial Crisis 2008]

 
Publication Date:   5/25/2009
Frequency:   Annual
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   5/27/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39268407
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadians have kept a closer eye on their monthly expenditures in the past six months [budgeting, Financial Crisis 2008], % say they have stopped buying non-essential items, % are eating out less or bringing their lunch to work in an effort to save more.

% of young Canadians (aged 18-34), have taken a part-time job to maximize their cash flow

% said that quality and better value for money was important to them, % rated lower cost/fees as being very important, % wanted a company with a solid reputation, % valued a predictable fee that did not change month to month, % thought receiving something above and beyond the product or service was very important.

 
Publication Date:   5/25/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   5/26/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39268391
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Poll of married and common-law Canadian, % have made a better effort to work together with their spouse or partner on making financial decisions within the last 12 years, % are talking about money more often

% admit they disagree about financial matters, % said their disagreements were mild, % said sever, % said disagreements affected other aspects of their relationship.

% of couples report they are providing financial support to at least one family member.

% of couples argue about money and spending habits, % argue about borrowing and debt issues.

% report their household is the same financially as compared with a year ago, % say it has improved, % say they are worse off, Of those who say they are worse off, % attribute their status to a decline in the value of their investments, underemployment, job loss [unemployment], declining real estate values, % indicated that either they or their spouse have lost a job in the last year.

% of married or common-law Canadians have taken measures to reduce their personal spending [family budgeting], % report feeling uncertain, enjoying life less, feeling depressed, losing sleep [Financial Crisis 2008]

 
Publication Date:   5/21/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   5/22/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39267988
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey of Canadians on the global financial crisis and its impact on their saving and investing strategies throughout the RRSP season. [Financial Crisis 2008]

Includes: % have taken steps to improve their savings, % have created a household budget to help tame expenses [budgeting], % will be making RRSP contributions this year, % have secured supplementary income through additional employment or a second mortgage, % have cut back on big-ticket purchases.

% believe they don't have enough funds to warrant a financial plan, % of Canadians who claim to be taking a more serious look at their money (Jan 2008 vs. Feb 2009), % of Canadians who are considering withdrawing from their RRSPs to supplement cash flow, % are considering cutting back on their RRSP contribution.

% planning to spend tax refunds on sensible, long-term needs, % plan on paying down credit cards, % taking advantage of the recent home renovation tax credit, % investing in a Tax-Free Savings Account TFSA or RRSP. [consumer confidence]

 
Publication Date:   2/26/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   2/28/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39267849
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadian women admitted having little or no interest in preparing for retirement, % said they hate being told that they are not saving enough for retirement, % said they would rather not know how much they need to save (vs. men).

% admit to feeling guilty that they are not saving enough for retirement, % believe they will never be able to accumulate enough retirement savings.

% of Canadian women have said they are prepared to make the following changes to save more for retirement: postpone a major purchase to avoid relying on financing or credit, take less expensive vacations, bring lunch from home rather than eating at a restaurant, significantly reduce the use of their car, reduce spending on sports or cultural activities, consider getting rid of the household's second car, reducing spending on children's activities.

% of Canadian women mentioned budgeting as their number one financial priority in 2009, % said they would make it a priority five years from now, % mentioned paying off the mortgage and other debts as the top financial priority, % mentioned saving for retirement.

 
Publication Date:   1/26/2009
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   1/30/2009
 
 
 
ID #:   39267527
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey of Canadians on their economic and financial capability. Includes: How important is it for individual citizens to have a good background in economic and financial knowledge and skills? To what extent would you support or oppose economic and financial education as a compulsory part of public schooling?

What are the sources of your economic and financial knowledge? How confident would you likely be, when faced with each of the following economic and financial decisions and challenges: Deciding whether to lease versus buy a car, Deciding where and how to invest your savings, Finding good financial help or a financial adviser, Managing your debt and credit, Preparing an effective household budget and financial plan [budgeting], Negotiating a loan or mortgage with a bank, Deciding which political party you prefer in terms of their economic policies and priorities, Understanding and preparing your tax return, Starting up a new business if you had a good idea, Understanding how interest charges are calculated on loans, credit cards etc., Saving effectively for your retirement, Determining whether interest rates are likely to be rising or falling

Series of questions designed to determine Canadians' understanding of economic principles.

Most results by gender, education and income level.

 
Publication Date:   11/24/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/25/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267523
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey of Canadians on retirement. Includes: % are confident they are saving enough for retirement, % rate their financial security as good or better, % say they know exactly where their retirement income will come from, % have easy access to a financial advisor, % believing they will never be able to accumulate enough savings to retire no matter what they do, % admit they have little or no interest in planning for retirement

What they would be willing to do to increase their retirement savings (e.g. % would postpone a major purchase to avoid using credit, % would take less expensive vacations, % would brown-bag their lunch, % would get rid of their household’s second car, % reduce their spending on activities for their children)

Financial priorities by number of years before retirement (more than 16 years, 5 to 16 years, less than 5 years, year of retirement and 2 years after retirement) - % reporting: Paying back debts, including mortgage, Staying within budget [budgeting], Saving to carry out projects, Providing financial help to children/grandchildren, Saving for retirement.

Follow-up survey after Financial Crisis 2008 - % of Canadians over forty said the following considerations would be very important to them when selecting savings and investment vehicles over the next year - Financial strength of their institution, Returns on the capital invested, Quality of advice received, Guarantee on the capital invested, More consideration to their personal and financial needs.

 
Publication Date:   11/20/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/24/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267500
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of teens are interested in learning about money management, % indicated that they know a lot about the subject, % of parents are actually providing an in-depth explanation of ways to save money to their teenagers, % of parents are willing to top up their teenagers’ allowances on command, preventing their teens from learning the value of money.

% of parents who consistently save money every month, % of their teenagers followed the same behaviour of their parents, % of teenagers save money and do it consistently every month, % of parents / teens set a budget and try to stick to it. [budgeting]

% of parents teach their teenagers about debit cards, % of teenagers indicate they have a strong understanding of it, % of parents teach their teenagers about savings accounts, % of teenagers indicate that they had a strong understanding of how to use a savings account.

% of parents say that teachers have a strong or very strong impact on teenager’s knowledge of money, % of teenagers indicate that their teachers taught them something about money. .

 
Publication Date:   11/17/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/19/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267464
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey on how Canadian women define financial success. Includes: % of Canadian women say being debt-free is the definition of financial success, % say having enough money for retirement, % say having money to buy anything I want

The most common step that women take to reach their financial goals - % report: follow a budget to manage their spending [budgeting], % have sought investment advice from a professional advisor [financial advisor]

Comparison of women who feel financially successful vs. those who don't - % Pay off credit cards in full every month to avoid paying interest, % Contribute regularly to an RRSP, Save/invest through a pre-authorized automatic savings or investment plan, % Seek investment advice from a professional advisor, % Contribute the maximum possible amount each year to your RRSP, % Read the financial pages of your newspaper, % Follow the stock market

% of women having a formal financial plan [financial planner], % of women have their own investment assets.

 
Publication Date:   11/13/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/14/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267408
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of parents are taking the time to provide an in-depth explanation to their teens about the importance of saving money, different saving vehicles and the benefits of each, % of parents set a budget for themselves and try to stick to it (vs. % of teens), % of parents think saving money is important and consistently save every month (vs. teens) [budgeting, saving]
 
Publication Date:   10/30/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
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Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   11/5/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267304
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % of Canadians workers say they always or usually live paycheque to paycheque just to make ends meet (2008 vs. 2006), % say they don't put any money aside for savings each month, % set aside less than $100 a month for savings, % save $50 or less, % say they do not participate in any kind of retirement plans.

% say they would need up to an additional $250 to $500 per paycheque to live comfortably. % say they have to work more than one job to keep up with monthly expenses.

% say they have a set budget each pay period [budgeting], % admit to typically going over it

 
Publication Date:   10/1/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   10/2/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267240
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   % Canadian students in their final year of high school turn to their parents for information on financial planning, % develop and maintain a budget, % of graduating high school students surveyed will attend post-secondary institutions next year, % will rely on student loans, % are realistic about the amount of debt they will accumulate [student loans], % indicated unrealistic expectations about their future starting salaries and their ability to repay student loans.

When asked the primary reasons why they don't stick to a financial plan % said that it was "totally unrealistic", believed it was "way too strict and hard to follow."

% of the students surveyed felt prepared or very prepared for managing money after high school, % had never created a budget before. [budgeting]

 
Publication Date:   9/23/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   9/28/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267189
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   List of daily life comforts Canadians refuse to give up no matter the cost - % refuse to give up Internet connection, Cable TV, Cell phone.

To save money each month, % of Canadians are willing to sacrifice: Buying magazines, music, DVDs and videogames, Movies, Eating out, % of Canadians say they drive less now than they did a couple of months ago due to gasoline prices, % of Canadians use their bank's ABM "only when it is convenient" or use any bank ABM machines "regardless of whether it is (their) bank's or not. [budgeting]

 
Publication Date:   9/15/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
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Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   9/18/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267160
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey of post-secondary students on finances and budgeting. Includes: % of post-secondary students indicated that money was tight at some point during the past school year, % claiming it was tight all year round.

When funds were tight, % said they coped by: spending less on food, not buying all the books they needed for class, paying their tuition late.

% are starting the new school year with a budget in hand, % say they'll stick to it, % share of budget that the following account for: school-related expenses (including tuition, books, and other academic fees), food and housing.

Among those current students who were unable to stick to their budgets % blamed unexpected expenses, % said budget was not realistic, % work part-time while attending school, % citing the need to pay bills as the reason, % of students who are currently attending college or university expect to graduate debt free. [student loans]

% are managing their finances themselves, % are trying to do most of their financial management themselves, while seeking some help from parents and other relatives, % are relying primarily on parents and other relatives.

 
Publication Date:   9/9/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
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Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   9/10/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267148
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey of students who have recently graduated or are set to graduate from a Canadian university or college in the next 12 to 24 months.

Includes: % say current economic conditions will have either a positive impact or no impact on their post-graduation plans. [consumer confidence]

% say a financial priority is to pay off their student loans, % indicate that saving for a down payment for a house or condo is a financial priority, % anticipate being ready to buy their first home in three to eight years, Average age of a first-time homeowner in Canada

% of students/recent graduates believe they will not be ready to retire until they are at least 65 years old, % consider themselves average or above average when it comes to money management skills, % say that choosing what to save and invest in should be easier, % say that the variety of savings and investment choices are intimidating. [budgeting]

 
Publication Date:   9/4/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   9/5/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267089
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Survey of post-secondary students and money management [budgeting]. Includes: % have a summer job, % plan to use money earned to help pay for living expenses and tuition in the coming school year, % still worried about having enough money to last them through the school year.

% they dip in to savings to cover every day expenses, % said they skip meals to save money, % said they forego medication, dental visits or other medical treatment, % said they sometimes wear dirty clothes when they can't afford a visit to the laundromat

% of students do not develop a budget and stick to it, % do not track their daily purchases, % are saving less than half of their summer earnings for the upcoming school year% said they learned how to manage their finances from their parents, % learned about financial management at school, % taught themselves.

 
Publication Date:   8/21/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   8/22/2008
 
 
 
ID #:   39267021
Title:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Source:  
 
Description:   Poll on financial concerns. Includes: % of Canadians feel anxious when they think about money matters, % believe they should be better able to manage their money [budgeting], % said they should have a better handle on their personal finances, % of households with income greater than $100,000 said they have lost sleep worrying about money matters.

Key financial fears: % cited: not having enough money to retire comfortably, % spending beyond their means, % are concerned they don't enjoy money while they got it, % worry they will outlive their money.

% of Canadians feels completely fluent in financial matters, % admit they can get by, but sometimes need help, % said that financial institutions make money matters more complicated.

% of Canadians are least comfortable talking about money, politics, religion, % of married/common law couples discuss their personal purchases with each other, % of Canadian parents talk about money with their children. [financial planner]

 
Publication Date:   8/6/2008
Frequency:    
Location Type:   Online
Geography:   Canada
 
Hyperlink 1:   This information available to subscribers only. For more information click here
Hyperlink 2:  
Location 1:  
Location 2:  
 
Notes:  
Posted/Updated:   8/8/2008
 
 
 
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